Review- Caristia, Group Show by Christine Connor

Discovering Art in Chicago

Group Exhibition Review, February 21-22, 2015  

by: Emily Alesandrini

Tuesday, March 17, 2015

Caristia: Celebrating Family and Arts on Elston

Group Exhibition Review, February 21-22, 2015

by Emily Alesandrini

Caristia was an ancient Roman holiday celebrating the love of family with banqueting, gift-giving, and reconciliation. Honoring ancestors and relatives, party-goers feasted on cake and wine with loved ones. This February, the Connor family exhibited their Caristia, a group exhibition of multi-media artworks by family members and friends in the multi-roomed gallery space, Arts on Elston.

Works on canvas, wood, paper and cement provide an eclectic ambiance—a visual diversity that keeps the viewer engaged room after room.  Artist and gallery owner Arthur Connor commented on this diverse medley of artwork saying, “The hope is to show pictures perhaps people didn’t even know they wanted to see.”  In response, cousin and fellow artist Eileen Madden added, “No one walks in and says, ‘What I like isn’t here.’” Arthur, a painter, sculptor, and furniture craftsman, is joined in the space by Eileen Madden and Vanessa Shaf, whose Paper and Print studio just relocated to the building.     

The gallery space itself is repurposed from a retired bakery, and comfy seating in nearly every room continues the space’s legacy of warm invitation. Sculptor and Painter Christine Connor remarks how the multiple rooms, “allow for personal intimacy with the works.”  The viewer feels more like a guest in the home of a welcoming collector than a visitor to a public gallery.

Vibrantly colored fish in oil pastel, politically incited mixed media works, industrial metal sculptures, letterpress poetry on delicately handmade paper and luscious nudes in oil on linen adorn the walls and floor space of the gallery rooms. The range of artistic representation reflects the diversity within this family of artists and friends. The vibrant, cacophonous details of life are the broad themes of Caristia.

Arts on Elston frequently collaborates with Rebecca George, founder/director of the nearby art school and gallery space, The Art House. Up next for The Art House and Arts on Elston is Art By America, a national exhibition of two-dimensional artwork juried by Ginny Voedisch of the Art Instiutue of Chicago Museum and James Yood of Artforum Magazine. Participating artists will receive all sale proceeds. Application deadline: March 20, 2015. APPLY and stay tuned to the exhibitions page at The Art House  to learn more about upcoming opportunities to exhibit and attend art openings at The Art House and Arts on Elston.

Caristia’s artists include: Heather Aitken, Celene Aubrey, Arthur Connor, Christine Connor, Elizabeth Connor, Mae Connor, Karl Fresa, Gordon France, Rebecca George, Eileen Madden, Dan Mullens, Vanessa Shaf. 

Arts on Elston

3446 North Albany Ave
Chicago, IL 60618
 

Untitled and Auger Bit  Christine Connor

Untitled and Auger Bit
Christine Connor

Review-Chicago Artists Month by Christine Connor

ChicagoArtistsMonthLOGO.jpg

After an exhibition-hiatus last year, TRANSIT is back participating in Chicago Artists Month, with our Artists Crossing Borders exhibition, at Arts on Elston. This year’s Chicago Artists Month is the nineteenth annual celebration of Chicago’s vibrant art community presented by the Chicago Department of Cultural Affairs and Special Events. This year’s theme for CAM is “Crossing Borders.”

Exhibition runs October 6 -30, 2014
at Arts on Elston, 3446 N. Albany, Chicago IL 60618

Arts on Elston is also part of Artists Crossing Borders, presenting the works of Beth Borum, Arthur Connor, Christine Connor, Elizabeth Connor, Mary Dorrell, Rebecca George, and Margaret Park. These seven Chicago artists cross borders in their material exploration and review of the personal, the functional and the non-traditional representation of object and the self. Uniting in crossing borders by seeking liberation, these artists challenge the conditioned approach to art-making and its significance in contemporary society.

Work by Christine Ann Connor

Work by Christine Ann Connor